English Composition II

ENG 123

YC Academy’s English Composition II course engages students in thinking and writing critically about the human experience as seen through the lens of literature. The course introduces students to different literary genres and engages them in the close reading and critical analysis of literary texts. Students write expository, analytical, and argumentative essays based on the ideas and subjects explored in those works.

Register Now

Course Outline

Click the + icon in each module to see its contents.

Outcomes/Objectives

Click on each tab to view its contents.

Module #1

What is Literature?

  • What is Literature?
  • What Can Literature Teach Us?
  • Language, Source, Form, and Structure of Literature
  • How Do We Read Literature?
  • Writing About Literature

Module #3

Epic Poetry

  • The Odyssey: History, Plot, and Characters
  • The Odyssey: Major Themes
  • John Milton: Paradise Lost
  • Beowulf
  • Writing a Character Analysis

Module #5

Poetry After 1800

  • Edgar Allan Poe

  • William Wordsworth

  • Brownings and Dickinson

  • Alfred, Lord Tennyson

  • Walt Whitman

  • Writing About Language and Imagery in Literature

Module #7

The Novel

  • William Defoe: Robinson Crusoe
  • Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice
  • Louisa May Alcott: Little Women
  • Mark Twain: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • Stephen Crane: The Red Badge of Courage
  • Writing About Plot and Structure

Module #9

The Essay

  • Benjamin Franklin: “The Whistle”
  • Patrick Henry: “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death”
  • Susan B.Anthony: “On Women’s Right To Vote”
  • Mark Twain: “The Turning Point of My Life”
  • Helen Keller: “Optimism Within”
  • Writing an Essay

Module #2

The Genres of Literature

  • Lesson 1: The Epic
  • Lesson 2: Drama
  • Lesson 3: Poetry
  • Lesson 4: Prose
  • Lesson 5: Writing About the Human Experience

Module #4

Poetry Before 1800

  • William Shakespeare
  • John Donne
  • Andrew Marvell
  • John Keats
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley
  • Writing About Theme in Literature

Module #6

Drama

  • Sophocles: Antigone
  • William Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet
  • Oscar Wilde: The Importance of Being Earnest
  • G.B. Shaw: Pygmalion
  • Writing About Historical, Social, and Cultural Context

Module #8

Short Story

  • Guy de Maupassant: “The Necklace”
  • Anton Chekhov: “The Bet”
  • O. Henry: “The Ransom of Red Chief”
  • Susan Glaspell: “A Jury of Her Peers”
  • Edgar Allan Poe: “The Tell-Tale Heart”
  • Writing About Dramatic Conflict

Module #10

Writing a Research Paper

  • Researching a Novel
  • Sources of Information
  • Academic Integrity
  • MLA Formatting
  • Writing a Research Paper About a Novel
  • Communicating with Visual Aids
  • Using a Visual Aid in a Presentation

Read and analyze literary works from major authors in the genres of the epic, poetry, drama, and prose, including novels, short stories, and essays.

Bloom’s level 4

Explore the backgrounds and writing styles of the authors presented in the course, and examine the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure.

Bloom’s level 3

Create writing assignments including expository, analytical, and argumentative essays based on an understanding of specific literary texts and their structure, style, and themes, as well as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.

Bloom’s level 5

Create and revise a final project consisting of reading a specific novel, writing a research paper about that novel, and preparing and delivering a visual presentation.

Bloom’s level 5

Course Outline

Click the + icon in each module to see its contents.

Module #1

What is Literature?

  • What is Literature?
  • What Can Literature Teach Us?
  • Language, Source, Form, and Structure of Literature
  • How Do We Read Literature?
  • Writing About Literature

Module #3

Epic Poetry

  • The Odyssey: History, Plot, and Characters
  • The Odyssey: Major Themes
  • John Milton: Paradise Lost
  • Beowulf
  • Writing a Character Analysis

Module #5

Poetry After 1800

  • Edgar Allan Poe

  • William Wordsworth

  • Brownings and Dickinson

  • Alfred, Lord Tennyson

  • Walt Whitman

  • Writing About Language and Imagery in Literature

Module #7

The Novel

  • William Defoe: Robinson Crusoe
  • Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice
  • Louisa May Alcott: Little Women
  • Mark Twain: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • Stephen Crane: The Red Badge of Courage
  • Writing About Plot and Structure

Module #9

The Essay

  • Benjamin Franklin: “The Whistle”
  • Patrick Henry: “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death”
  • Susan B.Anthony: “On Women’s Right To Vote”
  • Mark Twain: “The Turning Point of My Life”
  • Helen Keller: “Optimism Within”
  • Writing an Essay

Module #2

The Genres of Literature

  • Lesson 1: The Epic
  • Lesson 2: Drama
  • Lesson 3: Poetry
  • Lesson 4: Prose
  • Lesson 5: Writing About the Human Experience

Module #4

Poetry Before 1800

  • William Shakespeare
  • John Donne
  • Andrew Marvell
  • John Keats
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley
  • Writing About Theme in Literature

Module #6

Drama

  • Sophocles: Antigone
  • William Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet
  • Oscar Wilde: The Importance of Being Earnest
  • G.B. Shaw: Pygmalion
  • Writing About Historical, Social, and Cultural Context

Module #8

Short Story

  • Guy de Maupassant: “The Necklace”
  • Anton Chekhov: “The Bet”
  • O. Henry: “The Ransom of Red Chief”
  • Susan Glaspell: “A Jury of Her Peers”
  • Edgar Allan Poe: “The Tell-Tale Heart”
  • Writing About Dramatic Conflict

Module #10

Writing a Research Paper

  • Researching a Novel
  • Sources of Information
  • Academic Integrity
  • MLA Formatting
  • Writing a Research Paper About a Novel
  • Communicating with Visual Aids
  • Using a Visual Aid in a Presentation

Outcomes/Objectives

Click on each tab to view its contents.

Read and analyze literary works from major authors in the genres of the epic, poetry, drama, and prose, including novels, short stories, and essays.

Bloom’s level 4

Explore the backgrounds and writing styles of the authors presented in the course, and examine the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure.

Bloom’s level 3

Create writing assignments including expository, analytical, and argumentative essays based on an understanding of specific literary texts and their structure, style, and themes, as well as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.

Bloom’s level 5

Create and revise a final project consisting of reading a specific novel, writing a research paper about that novel, and preparing and delivering a visual presentation.

Bloom’s level 5

Outcomes/Objectives

Click on each tab to view its contents.

Read and analyze literary works from major authors in the genres of the epic, poetry, drama, and prose, including novels, short stories, and essays.

Bloom’s level 4

Explore the backgrounds and writing styles of the authors presented in the course, and examine the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure.

Bloom’s level 3

Create writing assignments including expository, analytical, and argumentative essays based on an understanding of specific literary texts and their structure, style, and themes, as well as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.

Bloom’s level 5

Create and revise a final project consisting of reading a specific novel, writing a research paper about that novel, and preparing and delivering a visual presentation.

Bloom’s level 5

Course Outline

Click the + icon in each module to see its contents.

Module #1

What is Literature?

  • What is Literature?
  • What Can Literature Teach Us?
  • Language, Source, Form, and Structure of Literature
  • How Do We Read Literature?
  • Writing About Literature

Module #2

The Genres of Literature

  • Lesson 1: The Epic
  • Lesson 2: Drama
  • Lesson 3: Poetry
  • Lesson 4: Prose
  • Lesson 5: Writing About the Human Experience

Module #3

Epic Poetry

  • The Odyssey: History, Plot, and Characters
  • The Odyssey: Major Themes
  • John Milton: Paradise Lost
  • Beowulf
  • Writing a Character Analysis

Module #4

Poetry Before 1800

  • William Shakespeare
  • John Donne
  • Andrew Marvell
  • John Keats
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley
  • Writing About Theme in Literature

Module #5

Poetry After 1800

  • Edgar Allan Poe

  • William Wordsworth

  • Brownings and Dickinson

  • Alfred, Lord Tennyson

  • Walt Whitman

  • Writing About Language and Imagery in Literature

Module #6

Drama

  • Sophocles: Antigone
  • William Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet
  • Oscar Wilde: The Importance of Being Earnest
  • G.B. Shaw: Pygmalion
  • Writing About Historical, Social, and Cultural Context

Module #7

The Novel

  • William Defoe: Robinson Crusoe
  • Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice
  • Louisa May Alcott: Little Women
  • Mark Twain: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • Stephen Crane: The Red Badge of Courage
  • Writing About Plot and Structure

Module #8

Short Story

  • Guy de Maupassant: “The Necklace”
  • Anton Chekhov: “The Bet”
  • O. Henry: “The Ransom of Red Chief”
  • Susan Glaspell: “A Jury of Her Peers”
  • Edgar Allan Poe: “The Tell-Tale Heart”
  • Writing About Dramatic Conflict

Module #9

The Essay

  • Benjamin Franklin: “The Whistle”
  • Patrick Henry: “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death”
  • Susan B.Anthony: “On Women’s Right To Vote”
  • Mark Twain: “The Turning Point of My Life”
  • Helen Keller: “Optimism Within”
  • Writing an Essay

Module #10

Writing a Research Paper

  • Researching a Novel
  • Sources of Information
  • Academic Integrity
  • MLA Formatting
  • Writing a Research Paper About a Novel
  • Communicating with Visual Aids
  • Using a Visual Aid in a Presentation

Lesson Features

Each of our lessons is designed as self-contained learning environment that provides all the context, explanation, and resources you need to learn about a specific topic. We give you the information you need in a format that helps you apply it in your daily life.

Context

Knowing why a topic matters and how it applies to your experience is an important part of learning anything. That’s why we make sure you have the proper context for the information we give you.

Video Overview

Every TEL Library lesson features a video overview of the information being presented. Our videos provide helpful text callouts and a downloadable transcript.

Readings

We provide two different readings that elaborate information related to the lesson topic. The first gives you essential, objective information while the second offers a deeper look at a specific sub-topic or a view of different perspectives.

Check Your Knowledge

Developing a clear understanding of a topic generally requires that you spend time reflecting on the meaning or impact of its concepts and information. We facilitate this reflection with polls designed to help you create connections to the topic.

d

Glossary

It’s easy to get tripped up on unfamiliar terms when you’re trying to learn something new. We’ve developed in-line glossary definitions of key terms to help make lessons easier to read and understand.

Toolbox Resources

We know that our lessons are simply a starting point for many learners. That’s why we provide a toolbox with related web resources for each lesson so that you can continue your learning journey on a specific topic.

Register Now